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Thread: how much do meter's run?

  1. #1
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    how much do meter's run?

    Aron and I were discussing light meters, what the best kinds are and how much the price range is for a good one. I am still new at this so would like to know if they are multi function inside and out or if there are differant ones ofr differant things... I have heard alittle about them but again never realy payed attention till last night and would like to learn more... Thanks to anyone who can help me out...
    As of April 22dn I am now Mrs. Aron Cartes.. (aceman152)

  2. #2
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    There are many different kinds of light meters, but generally there are a couple of readings that they will allow you to take. Your camera has a reflective meter, meaning that it measures the light reflecting off the subject. Most hand held meters will also measure incident light which is the light falling on the meter's sensor. Incident light isn't affected by the material of the subject. Many of them can also trigger strobes so that you can measure the light they are producing. The Sekonic L358 is a very popular model and is about $250. This is what I use, because you can buy a chip to put in it that will wirelessy trigger Pocket Wizards... avoiding the need to move your sync cable from each strobe to the meter. A meter is a very handy tool for general photography, but absolutely essential when using studio strobes.

    "Sometimes I do get to places just when God's ready to have somebody click the shutter..."
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    Canon 5DMk3 (gripped), 17-40L f/4, 24-70L f/2.8 II, 70-200L f/2.8 IS II, 100 f/2.8 Macro, 135L f/2, 200L f/1.8, TC1.4 II, TC2 III, 600EX-RT (2), ST-E3-RT
    Sigma 15 f/2.8 Fisheye

  3. #3
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    Lol.. I think I got most of it but I hope that Aron is reading this too... He knows more about it than I do so he can figure the rest out that I don't get... Thank you! I am thinkin I am going to go check out that meter here very soon so that I can atleast see what it is like and go from there to see what Aron says.
    As of April 22dn I am now Mrs. Aron Cartes.. (aceman152)

  4. #4
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    The Sekonic is a great meter and well suited for basic photography. I had not used one for most of my photography but decided it was a definate need for stepping up to the next level with my photography.
    Ross Mealey
    Canon Professional Services Member

  5. #5
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    Hmmmmm Would you use a light meter out in the field, Say for like a general metering for an event? I would only drop "Half a lens" worht of $$ for one if I was serious about portrait work...other than that, isnt the on board meter in the cam good enough? I was looking into one but couldnt justify it.. well I could if I really wanted it.. I can just about , justify ANYTHING if I really want it..lol
    Canon EOS 30D With grip, various lenses and stuff...

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    I would tell you this... since I started using the meter... I carry it everywhere... and use it all the time... of course it doesnt always give completely favorable shots... so what I do is get a basic metering... and then I shoot in manual and adjust accordingly to be -1/3 to -2/3 exposure. The changeover from metering from the cam to metering with the light meter is really night and day depending on the shot...
    Ross Mealey
    Canon Professional Services Member

  7. #7
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    I use it in the field too... especially if I'm shooting manual. The light can change during the day by several stops, and this will effect you pictures. It is also effected by the reflectivity of the subject, depending on what metering mode you are using.

    "Sometimes I do get to places just when God's ready to have somebody click the shutter..."
    Ansel Adams


    "... So don't choke and screw it up!" Me

    Mike Collins



    Canon 5DMk3 (gripped), 17-40L f/4, 24-70L f/2.8 II, 70-200L f/2.8 IS II, 100 f/2.8 Macro, 135L f/2, 200L f/1.8, TC1.4 II, TC2 III, 600EX-RT (2), ST-E3-RT
    Sigma 15 f/2.8 Fisheye

  8. http://cgi.ebay.com/Minolta-Light-Me...QQcmdZViewItem


    This is the exact one I have, and it works like a charm

    Its a great all-around meter.

  9. #9
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    Thank you all for your help... I am suire Aron has seen this already and I know we will be discussing it more so if I ask any dumd questions please don't lose pacients with me.... Again thank you!!! (Sorry bout the spelling too)
    As of April 22dn I am now Mrs. Aron Cartes.. (aceman152)

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