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View Full Version : It works it.....really does!



aceman152
04-06-2007, 11:21 AM
Well I have had a dual core processor for a couple months, and some one at work told me about seperating programs among the cores to speed things up. So I wanted to give it a try and low and behold it makes life so much easier....computer doesn't even know I have Photoshop running on one all by it self and all the other stuff like AIM, Yahoo Messenger, and Firefox running on the other.

Its pretty simple to get going, just go to task manager --> applications : right click the app and select GO TO PROCESS --> the right click the highlighted process and go to set affinity from here select among the different cores your computer has.

Hope this helps!

Orgnoi1
04-06-2007, 11:35 AM
Wow interesting... I will have to check that out for sure...

aceman152
04-06-2007, 11:49 AM
If need be I can post up some screen shots later....or make better directions....but now that I realize that you can do this I might have to up grade to a quad core!!!!!

nvr2low
04-06-2007, 12:24 PM
now only if i had a dual core.

zacker
04-06-2007, 01:25 PM
now only if i had a dual core.

Man, I aint even sure I got a core!! I did stay in a Motel 6 though!

convergent
04-06-2007, 01:31 PM
This sounds interesting... did you notice a speed change? I took a look and the running processes were defaulting to run on both cores. I'm wondering if it wouldn't be better to let the OS handle this in most cases. I didn't try it yet, but I would guess that manually changing it would not be persistent, meaning that you'd have to go back in and reset all the processes everytime you start or stop something. I just rebooted about a half hour ago, so I haven't actually started up much stuff... only 3 apps showing... and I have 76 processes running that are all set to run on both cores. So, I would think you'd have to go through all of them to split them out and isolate a core.

If this does result in some big performance gains, just imagine what it will be like with the quad core processors.

convergent
04-06-2007, 01:35 PM
For those that don't know what a core is and don't want to ask... this is an explanation... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-core_(computing)

CruzinGirl
04-07-2007, 02:20 AM
my toshiba has a sticker on it that says intel centrino duo.....is that it??? lol

I have to say, I can make any program run and figure anything out without instructions usually on my computer, but when it comes to the hardware I"m lost.:doh

zacker
04-07-2007, 07:18 AM
For those that don't know what a core is and don't want to ask... this is an explanation... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-core_(computing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-core_%28computing))

thanks mike, i figured it was that....

Hey, Im not afraid to ask.... Im proud of my ability to not take myself too seriously. I actually feel kinda bad for those who get embarrased because they dont know something... I do. Well, I can say, the only wayim having a dual core is to stack both my desktops one on the other.....lol

aceman152
04-07-2007, 09:34 AM
This sounds interesting... did you notice a speed change? I took a look and the running processes were defaulting to run on both cores. I'm wondering if it wouldn't be better to let the OS handle this in most cases. I didn't try it yet, but I would guess that manually changing it would not be persistent, meaning that you'd have to go back in and reset all the processes everytime you start or stop something. I just rebooted about a half hour ago, so I haven't actually started up much stuff... only 3 apps showing... and I have 76 processes running that are all set to run on both cores. So, I would think you'd have to go through all of them to split them out and isolate a core.

If this does result in some big performance gains, just imagine what it will be like with the quad core processors.

Right you will have processes running and the SYSTEM, LOCAL SERVICE, and NETWORK SERVICE I found you cannot change but the ones that are named after computer or log on name you can change....and so far I haven't rebooted since I set up the firefox and Photoshop on different cores, but have shut the programs off and opened again this morning and they do seperate to the preset cores, I will let you know when I do a reboot.

As far as performance gains I have no bench test equipment here..just me and the computer with software....seems to me that if I want to multitask it makes the bigger memory eatting programs work better. From what I understand even though we have the multithreaded computers with multiple cores, the software is still not available that will actually make the program utilize the seperate cores to maximize use.....hope that makes sense.

zacker
04-07-2007, 09:42 AM
hey Aron.... Are you speaking Martian??
lol
Now I wana go buy a new comp but honestly..... I really want a MAC dammit!!! PLEASE... SOMEONE SEND ME A CHECK FOR 3 GRAND!!!!!

aceman152
04-07-2007, 10:21 AM
Nah not martian, I know what you mean about really wanting a MAC, but the 2 companies (APPLE and MICROSOFT) are pretty much in cahoots now....so it is in all honesty cheaper to by a PC and you get about the same performance.

But take note of this stuff in this thread should be possible on a MAC as well if you decide to go that route.

JerseyMutt
04-07-2007, 02:14 PM
So in other words your tuning it like you would a car that is normally setup for the average driver.

zacker
04-07-2007, 02:25 PM
more like a car with two motors... one normal and the other High performance... i think!

JerseyMutt
04-07-2007, 02:48 PM
Eh..not so much per se. As the dual-cores are both used on a regular basis, but with the default setup everything is evenly distributed, which might not always work the best.

aceman152
04-07-2007, 09:03 PM
Eh..not so much per se. As the dual-cores are both used on a regular basis, but with the default setup everything is evenly distributed, which might not always work the best.

Exactly!!!!

TomNanos
04-10-2007, 02:53 PM
And actually the application needs to be written and compiled to take advantage of both cores in parallel (I think PS is), otherwise work is split between the two cores sequentially by the OS. Basically dual core chips are just 2 CPUs, with the glue chips and cache all on the same die, in one package. Setting the process' affinity via taskman will reset at reboot. You can manually set it up using the imagecfg.exe utility. Google it - it's a Microsoft utility, so it should be safe. Everything I've read is it works on any NT based OS (NT4, Win2k, XP & presumably Vista).