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TomNanos
09-25-2006, 02:25 PM
OK, I'll give you all a warning here - this was manipulated in Photoshop to give it the look you see. But as with all my stuff, there were no material edits to the photo - all the original stuff is there, it only looks different. :D I was playing with different techniques - one of which was making a photo look like a scale model. The original is here:

http://www.nanosphoto.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-915

And here's the result:

http://www.nanosphoto.com/_MG_4510-01-model.jpg

Orgnoi1
09-25-2006, 02:31 PM
actually that type of manipulation looks great... my question is more a technical one than a camera one... is that second engine a slug?

TomNanos
09-25-2006, 02:37 PM
actually that type of manipulation looks great... my question is more a technical one than a camera one... is that second engine a slug?
Nope, not a slug. It's a cabless unit. Difference is a slug only has traction motors and is semi-permanently coupled to and electrically connected to the mother unit. In a mother/slug setup, the mother's prime mover and generator provide power to the traction motors on both the mother & slug units. Slugs usually have a huge block of concrete where the prime mover used to be. Cabless units (or B-Units as they're also known as) are complete locomotives without a cab. Only restriction is they can't lead the train because there's no place for the crew to sit. The main purpose of mother/slugs is increased tractive effort (mostly used in hump yards - you'll see them all the time in Selkirk, for example), while the B-units are used to add more horsepower to the train.

-Tom

Orgnoi1
09-25-2006, 02:38 PM
Thanks... that cleared up a bit... =)

rpiano
09-25-2006, 02:41 PM
Tom other than the reduction in depth of field, what else was done? The only other thing I would guess at is oversharpening the sweetspot slightly to give it a smaller feel.

You accomplished your goal, because I was fooled before reading the text.

Orgnoi1
09-25-2006, 02:45 PM
Tom other than the reduction in depth of field, what else was done? The only other thing I would guess at is oversharpening the sweetspot slightly to give it a smaller feel.

You accomplished your goal, because I was fooled before reading the text.

the only reason I knew right off was the other post Tom put up... I would have questioned this in my own mind but it would have been hard right off to tell without really looking... even the sky matches the lame sky coloring we have been having across the NE lately...

TomNanos
09-25-2006, 02:47 PM
Tom other than the reduction in depth of field, what else was done? The only other thing I would guess at is oversharpening the sweetspot slightly to give it a smaller feel.

You accomplished your goal, because I was fooled before reading the text.
Nope, no oversharpening - only some pretty drastic curves to make everything look plasticy (is that a word?? ;)). Here's the general outline I followed:

http://recedinghairline.co.uk/tutorials/fakemodel/

I think I found it on DPReview a while back and always wanted to try it. This one shot screamed "model" to me, so I figured what the hell.... :D

TomNanos
09-25-2006, 02:49 PM
the only reason I knew right off was the other post Tom put up... I would have questioned this in my own mind but it would have been hard right off to tell without really looking... even the sky matches the lame sky coloring we have been having across the NE lately...
But I took the original back in April.... :D

rpiano
09-25-2006, 02:51 PM
Very cool, thanks for sharing and for such a quick response!

Orgnoi1
09-25-2006, 02:51 PM
But I took the original back in April.... :D

Like the sky was ANY different in April...:rolleyes:

TomNanos
09-25-2006, 03:07 PM
Like the sky was ANY different in April...:rolleyes:

Of course it was...don't you know the sky is always bluer in April...oh, wait, isn't that the grass is greener....or....aw, crap, I'm screwing up my cliches! :D

JustinL
09-25-2006, 03:22 PM
i saw this on POTN a while ago. You did real well with it. Makes it look like you used a tilt shift lens.