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View Full Version : Want to Save some Space on your "HD"



ProPhotoImages
08-16-2006, 03:31 PM
Are you beginning to run out of space on your hard drive? Or are you getting close to the limits of your hard drive?
Well here's a trick that will save a wee bit of room. Your trash can that sits on your desktop that you take for granted...reserves 10 percent of your hard drive for itself that you probally don't need or will ever use. For example if you have a 60gb hard drive, the trash can takes 6gb for itself. You can readjust that amount by going to your desktop, right click trashcan, left click global use one setting for all drives and move the slider to the left to about 2-3%. That's really all you need because as you do routine maintenence you empty that trash on a regular basis...RIGHT?

Try it. It won't hurt your system and you will gain more room. Later on, I will tell you how to save even more room. This is just to get you interested and started.

zacker
08-16-2006, 04:50 PM
oh do tell!!!!
lol thanks ted!

JustinL
08-16-2006, 09:46 PM
thank you Ted, did this just now. Thanks for the info

ATVinBarbie
08-17-2006, 08:22 AM
Ok... did it. :tup


oh do tell!!!!
lol thanks ted!

Yeah.... yeah.... tell us more. :D

ProPhotoImages
08-17-2006, 09:32 PM
Now let's save some more space. System Restore will also let you save some space just as the trash can did. Go to your desktop and right click My Computer....drop down to properties and left click it. When the menu box appears, left click system restore, then left click settings. You now have a slider which you can move left or right. You move it to the left. But experiment with this setting until it feels about right for your system. You will be able to see how much savings you are getting when you move that slider. Don't forget to hit "ok".
If later you find you moved left too far, go back in and move it to the right to increase the space. don't worry, you can't hurt the system. You will only have less restore points to work with. In fact what system restore does is when you have used up all your space, it deletes the oldest restore point to make room for a newer one.

zacker
08-18-2006, 07:54 AM
lol...did it.. now what? go see my lighting thread please! I need you input!

stoneylonesome
08-18-2006, 08:19 AM
A great big THANKS for that one. Keep em coming. :) Boy I'm glad I found out about this, for some reason my computer here at work had 10% sit for the bin, it's now 4%

ProPhotoImages
08-18-2006, 08:19 AM
What now? Since you have saved a bunch of space with these tricks, you might "ditch" some of those programs (software) you never use. I know that over time, I have accumulated software I don't even use anymore, and being a pack rat, I hate to get rid of anything, burn some of that stuff to "cd's" and then uninstall it and save even more room. Don't forget to make a manual restore point first and after getting rid of some things, don't forget to "defrag" in safe mode.

jake4440
08-18-2006, 08:23 AM
thanks fo rthe tips!
i know defrag, but in safe mode?

zacker
08-18-2006, 09:07 AM
why defrag in safe mode? i just ran a disc check and defrag on my lap top which is so slow its sickening... anyway, its older and doesnt have much mem but it was also never this slow... so far i have dumped alot of programs, did these tricks you mentioned, defraged, ran adaware, did the disc check up, removed almost everything from the start folder to speed up start up and am looking for reasons as to why its so slow, this used to work well, in fact for about two years it was my main computer and i didnt touch my desk top which became my external HD for awhile..lol In fact, only after i thought i blew the laptop up did i go buy my desk top! Now its so slow its getting painful to use. i had purchased more meme but it causes the thing to lock up after a few mins.. any ideas?

stoneylonesome
08-18-2006, 11:29 AM
why defrag in safe mode? i just ran a disc check and defrag on my lap top which is so slow its sickening... anyway, its older and doesnt have much mem but it was also never this slow... so far i have dumped alot of programs, did these tricks you mentioned, defraged, ran adaware, did the disc check up, removed almost everything from the start folder to speed up start up and am looking for reasons as to why its so slow, this used to work well, in fact for about two years it was my main computer and i didnt touch my desk top which became my external HD for awhile..lol In fact, only after i thought i blew the laptop up did i go buy my desk top! Now its so slow its getting painful to use. i had purchased more meme but it causes the thing to lock up after a few mins.. any ideas?

Sounds to me like you have the latest in technology, "the smart computer" as YOU get OLDER it slows down for you so you can keep up.
:happy :frog :roll :roll :roll

ProPhotoImages
08-19-2006, 10:55 AM
The purpose in defragging in safe mode is because it does a more thourough job than defragging while the "OS" is up. When you go into safe mode only minimal drivers load instead of the complete "OS" drivers that run the system.

And if your "HD" is at 15 percent or goes below, the defrag utility will have a harder time of doing it's job. Don't let your "HD" get down to 15 percent because "defrag" needs that percentage to work with. Throw out some stuff or cut back with my prior tips for saving space.

TomNanos
08-22-2006, 09:54 AM
The purpose in defragging in safe mode is because it does a more thourough job than defragging while the "OS" is up. When you go into safe mode only minimal drivers load instead of the complete "OS" drivers that run the system.

And if your "HD" is at 15 percent or goes below, the defrag utility will have a harder time of doing it's job. Don't let your "HD" get down to 15 percent because "defrag" needs that percentage to work with. Throw out some stuff or cut back with my prior tips for saving space.
Only gain you'll get in defragging in safe mode is speed, and even that is minimal. Safe mode is still booting the OS - same kernel and base drivers as coming up in normal mode. Granted there's less chance of a driver going belly up on you and crashing the system while the defrag is going on, but there's no difference in the type of defrag job that is being performed. The defrag program doesn't care whether it's in safe mode or in a normal window.

Also, it depends on what file system you're using. If it's FAT32, then yes defragging will help you. NTFS doesn't suffer as badly as FAT32 does in the fragmentation realm due to the way the filesystem works. Basically the only downside to fragmentation on an NTFS filesystem is the heads have to move a bit more. FAT32, however, as your drive gets more fragmentented, it will slow because of the way FAT32 looks up the clusters containing the files on the disk. NTFS is much more effieicent in that realm. Basically a much more robust filesystem.

Also, if you're using NTFS you can compress the entire drive transparently. Basically you can zip the entire contents of your drive without changing the file. You still open it up like normal, but the operating system handles the compression/decompression on the fly as you save/open files. This can save space as well, especially if you have a lot of documents - those compress nicely. Images, however, are already compressed, so you won't gain much space.

ProPhotoImages
08-22-2006, 10:36 AM
Most device drivers are not loaded in safe mode. Only minimal drivers are loaded. Standard VGA drivers, no scanning or printer drivers are loaded. And here I am also assuming that having put on an XP OS system, you are using "NTFS" rather than "Fat 32" system. But one of the biggest reasons for safe mode is to allow you to also troubleshoot your system when having problems. I didn't mention that here either.

But Tom is right about "NTFS" being a more robust file system. And I didn't mean to imply that you save space by this defragging method. In case anyone got that idea.

TomNanos
08-22-2006, 10:58 AM
Most device drivers are not loaded in safe mode. Only minimal drivers are loaded. Standard VGA drivers, no scanning or printer drivers are loaded. And here I am also assuming that having put on an XP OS system, you are using "NTFS" rather than "Fat 32" system. But one of the biggest reasons for safe mode is to allow you to also troubleshoot your system when having problems. I didn't mention that here either.

But Tom is right about "NTFS" being a more robust file system. And I didn't mean to imply that you save space by this defragging method. In case anyone got that idea.
True, any 3rd party drivers are not loaded in Safe Mode. Basically like you mentioned the base VGA driver, along with mouse, except serial mice, keyboard, mass storage (hard drive interfaces - IDE, SCSI, etc. along with the actual hard drive/CDROM drivers), monitor, default system services, and no network connections. And that's it. That's why if you need to replace any software in Safe Mode, you need to make sure you have a copy of it on CD or on the hard drive because you can't hop on the net to download it...

Defragging will save some space on FAT32 filesystems - if it's really bad you'll notice it, otherwise it's usually only a few MB tops. You'll sometimes see FAT32 on XP systems that were upgraded from Windows 98, but I think generally XP defaults to NTFS on a new install.

I guess that brings us to the next question - what filesystem do I have? Easy way to tell - open up My Computer and right click on your hard drive and click Properties. Towards the top it'll tell you what fielsystem is being used - NTFS or FAT32. It's that easy... :D

-Tom

convergent
08-22-2006, 11:34 AM
With regard to defragging in safe mode, I also think that "loaded" programs and drivers can not be moved during defrag, so if it loads less stuff, you'll have less stuff that the OS won't move... which can keep the disk fragmented if it is on the full side.

TomNanos
08-22-2006, 11:55 AM
With regard to defragging in safe mode, I also think that "loaded" programs and drivers can not be moved during defrag, so if it loads less stuff, you'll have less stuff that the OS won't move... which can keep the disk fragmented if it is on the full side.
I think that's only on pre-NT systems (Win98 and prior). I believe the only non-movable files under the GUI (and that includes safe mode) are the swapfile and hibernation file (pagefile.sys and hiberfil.sys respectively - you'll only find hiberfil.sys if your system can go into hibernate mode, and it will be the same size as your physical RAM). Drivers and programs are loaded dynamically, and once they're in memory (either physical RAM or within the swap file on the disk), the file itself isn't being used. Yes, the OS does lock them so you can't delete/replace them when they're in use, but defrag can get around that and move the clusters around on the physical disk.

I'll try to research this a bit more, but I believe this is true on NT systems (NT 3.51 and later - yes, XP is an NT system - specifically it's Windows NT version 5.1). But I have been wrong before... :D ;)

zacker
08-22-2006, 01:16 PM
so if you are set for Hibernation and use it, its taking up that much memory? all my machines are set to hibernate and the desktops dont ever get shut down... unless its for re-bbot or work.. should i, or could i make em both faster if i disable the hibernate on them? I can live with watching a couple screen savers bounce around.