PDA

View Full Version : Adobe buys RawShooter engine



convergent
06-26-2006, 03:20 PM
Adobe buys RawShooter engine (http://www.dpreview.com/news/0606/06062602adobebuypixmantec.asp)

In a brief statement Adobe has announced that it has purchased the 'technology assets' of Pixmantec, the Danish company behind the RawShooter raw workflow and conversion application. Adobe states that this acquisition "strengthens Adobe's leadership position in raw processing" and that that Pixmantec's raw processing technology will be integrated into Lightroom and other Adobe products. RawShooter Premium will be discontinued although the Essential edition will continue to be available and support for existing RawShooter customers will be available from Adobe.

convergent
06-26-2006, 03:23 PM
Wow... this is a big news item. There are a couple of good alternatives for processing RAW files, and it looks like two of them just consolidated... which could be good or bad depending on your perspective. Since most people shooting RAW own Photoshop, then those that used RAW Shooter must have thought it was a lot better than Adobe Camera RAW. With this aquisition it will be interesting to see what becomes of RAW Shooter, and whether it will bring more users to Adobe, or drive them away to the other RAW solutions.

CruzinGirl
06-26-2006, 03:26 PM
Being someone very new to digital photography, could you explain what shooting is RAW is, the pros/cons to this type of photography (besides that it fills your memory card in no time, lol) and when it would be beneficial to use it.

convergent
06-26-2006, 03:41 PM
Being someone very new to digital photography, could you explain what shooting is RAW is, the pros/cons to this type of photography (besides that it fills your memory card in no time, lol) and when it would be beneficial to use it.
First off... I rarely shoot RAW. The last time I did was because I needed an image that couldn't be redone if it was messed up, and it needs to be blown up to a 4-5' poster sized picture. I usually shoot JPEG because of the workflow issues.

You can think of RAW as essentially a digital negative. Some things can be adjusted after the fact, which can not be adjusted later with JPEG files (without some data loss). White balance, color tone, sharpness, and even exposure, can be adjusted on the computer just as if the picture hadn't been taken yet. You will ultimately have more detail and flexibilty shooting RAW, but it also means that you have to process every image before you can do anything with it. While I'd like to do that anyway, I don't have the time for it. I also found that if I shoot RAW + JPEG, I almost never go back to the RAW files. What I've resorted to is an approach that says I only shoot RAW for very special images. It does mean you need to try and get your exposure and white balance right when you take the picture.

CruzinGirl
06-26-2006, 03:44 PM
Do you need special programs to process RAW or does the standard Photoshop/PaintshopPro do it?

ProPhotoImages
07-03-2006, 05:11 AM
Full Adobe Photoshop CS/CS 2, Adobe Elements 3/4, Paintshop Pro, PhotoBrush and most of the Camera Manufacturers have their proprietary software to process "RAW" files. Also Adobe has Adobe "DNG", Firegraphics, Picassa 2 and the now soon to disapear Raw Shooter Essentials which was bought by Adobe. You can since you already have a "Canon" use Digital Professional Pro which is free to process your raw. I can't remember whether Canon's Zoombrowser software will, but I think so. I'll check that one out and let you know.

convergent
07-03-2006, 09:32 AM
Do you need special programs to process RAW or does the standard Photoshop/PaintshopPro do it?

Prior to Photoshop CS, (the older versions) you had to get a separate plug-in to handle RAW. I don't recall if it was free or not. The issue with RAW is each camera manufacturer has their own format, and it varies from camera to camera... so it is difficult to keep up with for software developers. The other formats like TIFF, JPEG, etc., are standard and the same from one camera to the next. In the case of RAW, some manufacturers have even tried to make it a secret how it worked .... which is really wacky.

ProPhotoImages
07-03-2006, 12:47 PM
When the Adobe "RAW" and the DNG converter first hit the market, Version 7.0 was out and it was a plug-in. I had to pay $99.00 to get it. After that, CS or version 8 had it imbedded as a part of the program.