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View Full Version : Calling all computer guys (and gals)



zacker
05-15-2008, 08:58 AM
So i have an older Maxtor 250 GB One touch external HD holding ALL my files.. I wanna back it up but after reading some not so good reviews of the newer maxtors (with seagate drives) i have decided to perhaps, build my own... has anoyone done this? is it hard? remember.. i dont really know what im doing here..

so how does THIS work?? the discription makes it seem that there is a drive in it but if im correct, there isnt right? what do i add for a 500GB drive to make this work? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817173049 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817173049)

this??
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822136073 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822136073)

can someone suggest a set up that would work that is easy for a dumd **S like me to put togethre and actually use?

Im also open to suggestions on this and others from those in the know. Id like to get at least 500GB and keep it around $200.00 and less (more less if possible)

ChrisG
05-15-2008, 09:17 AM
first question is how do you plan to plug this into your computer? USB, firewire, eSATA?

and that second link is bad. also that box didnt get great reviews due to a shotty psu

zacker
05-15-2008, 09:21 AM
see? told you I dont know squat..lol
USB2

thanks Chris!

ChrisG
05-15-2008, 09:23 AM
might i suggest this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817145167

it has usb and eSATA (incase you only have usb and want to upgrade...about 6x more transfer speed with eSATA)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148288

and thats a blazing fast drive

JayVig
05-15-2008, 09:36 AM
Craig,

Save yourself the time and trouble. Get this - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136237

It's $154. It's 320 gigs. 3x5 at about a half inch thick. USB 2.0. Does NOT require external power. I know you said 500gb but this is 320 so it's still alot and the other features of it make it worth it. Built-in Sync software to backup certain folders one touch. I have a 120gb and a 250gb model and i love them. Give it a look

ChrisG
05-15-2008, 10:27 AM
another good option

ChrisG
05-15-2008, 10:29 AM
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136080

WD 500GB drive for 110 bucks

nvr2low
05-15-2008, 10:31 AM
i bought a $15 external case to put my 250G in, if you can build those drums you can do this, it took all of 2 minutes to install and have running. they all work the same, just plug in the drive, screw the case shut and plug it into your computer. I will never pay huge amounts for an external drive just for back up, it doesn make any sense when you can get twice the memory for less.

JayVig
05-15-2008, 10:37 AM
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136080

WD 500GB drive for 110 bucks

great size for a great price. downside is the external power.

JayVig
05-15-2008, 10:39 AM
i bought a $15 external case to put my 250G in, if you can build those drums you can do this, it took all of 2 minutes to install and have running. they all work the same, just plug in the drive, screw the case shut and plug it into your computer. I will never pay huge amounts for an external drive just for back up, it doesn make any sense when you can get twice the memory for less.

With pre-existing solutions like the Passport series, you also usually get sync software or some sort of file level encryption software.

ChrisG
05-15-2008, 10:44 AM
great size for a great price. downside is the external power.all personal preference. something like external power doesnt bother me since i dont use them on my laptop, only my desktop and i have power readily available

JayVig
05-15-2008, 10:47 AM
True Chris. The need for portability defines whether external power requirements are an issue or not.

nvr2low
05-15-2008, 12:57 PM
With pre-existing solutions like the Passport series, you also usually get sync software or some sort of file level encryption software.

for the limited amount mine is used i dont care about those things. i probably only plug mine in once a month, and thats a lot.

zacker
05-15-2008, 01:59 PM
Craig,

Save yourself the time and trouble. Get this - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136237

It's $154. It's 320 gigs. 3x5 at about a half inch thick. USB 2.0. Does NOT require external power. I know you said 500gb but this is 320 so it's still alot and the other features of it make it worth it. Built-in Sync software to backup certain folders one touch. I have a 120gb and a 250gb model and i love them. Give it a look

nice.. problem is... (dont laugh, you know how i work.. Italian remember?) I had a WD once, it failed before a year and i lost all my photos.. I swore i wouldnt knowingly buy another WD again.. but then again, every morning after a night of drinking, i swear im not gonna drink again too..lol thank god that doesnt happen as much as it used to.

zacker
05-15-2008, 02:10 PM
ok... i dont use it for anything but backing up photos, music and doc's i wanna save... and i have folders (shorcuts) on my desktop that when I click and drag the photo or folder into it, it puts it in the orig folder on the ext drive... so i dont think i need and transfer software...no?

JUMPquick
05-15-2008, 02:19 PM
For the record SATA drives are a really big PITA...

JayVig
05-15-2008, 02:28 PM
SATAs are quick and run cool so they're good but not a huge deal to have or not have. I'll ONLY use SATA for internal drives because of the speed.

Craig, you don't need transfer software but it does come in handy. just click sync and anything under c:\photos for instance will instantly be backed up. It will do a differential backup which won't overwrite everything, just changed files or additional files.

I tend not to use the backup alot of times because I save right to it - don't even use my internal HDD anymore (there's a quarter tera going to waste).

You can get a regular drive and an enclosure like you first mentioned and it works fine too, plus you have the added benefit of swapping out for larger drives in the future. Simplicity... buy a ready to go drive. Versatility and scalability... get a regular drive and enclosure.

It's 6 of one, half a dozen of another and personal preference.

About brands... Once upon a time I would only by Maxtor Drives until, I think, version 1.1 of MaxBlast software which was nearly necessary and a royal pita. Then I stuck with Seagates for many years because WD's were too expensive financially and to high a risk for data loss. Right after the IBM Microdrive came out, IBM shot to the top of quality. It's cyclical. Right now, these WD Passports are hot sellers. I see them everywhere on people's desks. They were big when the MyBook came out too but that's a behemoth. The Passports out now are the 2nd generation called MyPassport Essential with better read/write and seek times than 1st gen versions (which both of mine are).

Bottom line, go with the most bang for your buck, where bang = storage space. Space is more of a premium than seek times when it's just holding data and not used as a boot device, image source or running applications.

There's my 4 cents (that's twice as much as you needed. LOL).

ChrisG
05-15-2008, 03:16 PM
For the record SATA drives are a really big PITA...you have that backwards.....PATA is is PITA

brittonx
05-15-2008, 06:08 PM
Is this for use with a laptop or desktop?

If for desktop usage (you won't be lugging it around everywhere) you should consider a multi-drive enclosure with a RAID controller. This way, if one drive fails, you have not lost any data, you just replace the failed drive.
Here is an example:
http://www.mwave.com/mwave/skusearch.hmx?SCriteria=4741223&CartID=done&nextloc=
Then you put two drives in it.
This a more expensive solution but vastly reduces the chances of losing your photos due to a hardware failure.

I have a RAID setup internal to my PC at home just to avoid losing the photos.

convergent
05-15-2008, 08:20 PM
OK, I'll weigh in. The external drive you have consists of three parts. A hard drive, a case/power supply, and an interface. The hard drive that is in there is no different than what would be inside your computer.... its just sitting in an external box. The same choices exist in both cases... EIDE or SATA are the two most commonly used. For interfaces, you will have USB, Firewire, or eSATA. The first one, USB, exists on just about every computer so its the most common interface used. Firewire 800 is faster, but less common since you need another card to run it on many computers. eSATA is fast because its pretty much an extension of the internal SATA interface. The problem is that it does require a specialized cable and its not nearly as portable as the others.

If you want to have an ongoing backup device... i.e., have two drives backing each other up... then it will be important to think about how they are attached. I'd guess if you hung them both on the same USB2 card or hub and copied from one to the other, it would be pretty slow.

So the first thing is to inventory what slots and ports you have available on your computer, so that you can try to get the device setup so it will be quick. The older drives were EIDE and if this is what your computer has, then you usually have two channels inside the computer. If you had an open bay, then the best thing would be to put in an internal drive and put it on the other channel from the one your system drive is on. This would give you good speed in copying to your external, and for working with your images. If your system is SATA and you have a bay, then you could just get another SATA drive and install it internally.

I guess knowing what you have available would help.

CruzinGirl
05-16-2008, 09:15 AM
but then again, every morning after a night of drinking, i swear im not gonna drink again too..lol thank god that doesnt happen as much as it used to.

:fp


Who hasn't worshipped the porcelain goddess and made that promise????

Sorry, had to go off topic a little on that one, but its a reply so its alright, right???? :)

zacker
05-16-2008, 01:55 PM
so Mike... If i have an open bay inside? Hmmm... how about hooking up another external to another usb2 input on the computer and just backing up the back up? once all the files on it now are backed up into the new drive, i will then, only need to back up anything new i plan to save.. wich I do by drag and drop from the desktop.. also is there an easy way to do this so i only have to do it once? I mean, if i want to put a new floder into the first drive, and then back up THAT same folder on the 2nd drive, can i do this somehow by just putting it on the first drive then having it automatically go to the 2nd?

convergent
05-16-2008, 04:02 PM
There are ways to do what you are talking about, but a lot of specifics are particular to what you are doing. I used to have a couple of SimpleTech drives and you could buy two of them and they would automatically mirror to each other. That is one way, but proprietary. I think you may also be able to use the Microsoft SyncToy to do it, but not positive. Also, if you are using Lightroom, it will let you backup your files when you copy them from your cards. If it were me, I'd probably look at adding an internal drive, but I'm sure it would work to just go with another USB drive if you have a port. Just remember that the initial copy may be slower because they are both USB.

zacker
05-16-2008, 11:16 PM
yeah.. i want simple, good amount of space, a really good drive and convieniently priced.